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General Input Files (28 entries)
 
ANS2ABA
  Dave Lindeman (3M)
  This macro (actually, an input file of an ABAQUS verification problem) provides an example of using ANSYS to preprocess and write out an ABAQUS input deck. From the author: "Note that this is an APDL script that illustrates a translation procedure and NOT an independent macro (i.e., this is just a starting place for others -- customization IS required)."
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Average Rating: 10.0 (109 votes)  
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BAR
  Timothy Berger (UCLA)
  "I have included a rather long input file that I used for my Ph.D. dissertation on an SGI Origin 2000 supercomputer. I believe it is the low density mesh version but if you run into problems, go to lines 157-167 starting from /BATCH and lower the numbers as you see fit for my mesh parameters. I removed all of the constraint equations from the file below as it will slow ANSYS down considerably if they are included."
For additional notes by author, see contents of macro for more details.
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Average Rating: 10.0 (21 votes)  
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BATCH
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  This is an example of how to drag-and-drop a .db file onto a DOS batch file to initiate an analysis.

  1. Unzip the file and rename "Run Nonlinear.txt" to "Run Nonlinear.bat". Place it on your desktop.
  2. Place "solve_batch.inp" in your D: drive or edit "Run Nonlinear.bat" to change the location of this APDL input file.
  3. Drag and drop any .db file containing a ready-to-solve nonlinear analysis onto "Run Nonlinear.bat". You will find that the solution will initiate in the same working directory, and you can also track the nonlinear solution graphically as the solution is solving in batch.

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Average Rating: 10.0 (5 votes)  
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COAX
  Johann Riedler (EPCOS)
  "I created an input-file that simulates the skin-effect of a two-dimensional sector of a coax. During postprocessing you can clearly see the effect of the penetrating magnetic field into the metal. One may extend this model to 3D (perhaps coarser)."
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Average Rating: 10.0 (19 votes)  
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COMPFILLET
  Joe Metrisin (Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc.)
  "One way I've used to create a compound fillet or spline shape during an optimization run is by use of an elliptical coordinate system. You can get a very well behaved ellipse suitable for optimization with only 3-4 parameters. The procedure is to create two keypoints, and a local cylindrical coordinate system with the par1 option. Then, a line created between these two keypoints will have an elliptical shape.

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Average Rating: 10.0 (19 votes)  
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CONTROL
  Dave Lindeman (3M)
  "Listed below are an ANSYS input file, and a UITFIN subroutine that demonstrate the implementation of a PID control system using a simple spring-mass system."
UITFIN.F subroutine
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Average Rating: 10.0 (12 votes)  
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COUPLED-SEQ
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  Simple example demonstrating a sequential structural-thermoelectric analysis with plasticity and contact. The thermoelectric side uses UPGEOM to update displacements from the structural analysis.
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Average Rating: 10.0 (5 votes)  
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DADD
  Keith DiRienz (FEA Technologies)
  Sample input file to demonstrate the use of the undocumented DADD command.
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Average Rating: 6.7 (6 votes)  
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DAKOTA
  Dave Lindeman (3M)
  "I recently experimented with coupling ANSYS and DAKOTA, and thought the list might be interested in the results. DAKOTA, if you're not familiar with it, is a public-domain optimization code available from Sandia National Laboratories (see http://endo.sandia.gov/DAKOTA/). It has several advanced optimization algorithms (e.g., genetic algorithms), supports discrete variables, and has several other features that make it a nice complement to the optimization and probabilistic design modules within ANSYS. And it's FREE.
 
"Anyways, the procedure for using DAKOTA with ANSYS consists of creating a DAKOTA input file (DAKOTA in the attachments) that identifies the design variables, state variables, optimization method, etc. Also, within this file you identify the command to be issued to execute the code you are using to generate the response variables (analysis_driver = 'ansys.prl', in the attached example). To execute ANSYS I use an intermediate Perl script (ansys.prl) that translates the design variable file generated by DAKOTA (parameters_file = 'dakota.dv') into something ANSYS can understand (written out to ansys.dv). The Perl script then executes ANSYS. Note that the Perl script is general purpose -- it should work for any application. The only thing you should need to change is filenames, in particular the name of your ANSYS script (in my example, 'ANSYS'). The ANSYS script reads in the design variable file using /INPUT, performs the analysis, then outputs the result variables to a file (results_file = 'dakota.rv') using *CFOPEN and *VWRITE.
 
"To execute the analysis you use (for example) the command line: dakota -i DAKOTA > dakota.log &
 
"That's pretty much it. Pretty straightforward once you figure out the DAKOTA input file syntax. The attached example is the simple beam optimization problem used in the ANSYS documentation."

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Average Rating: 9.3 (27 votes)  
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DIFFUSION
  Steve Groothuis (Micron Technology, Inc.)
  "As a starting point, if you can accept the following analogy between thermal and moisture diffusion, I think you will be pleased in solving the time-dependent diffusion using this technique. As far as the temperature-dependent moisture diffusion, alternating between moisture mechanics and thermal mechanics can probably be done by updating material properties."
PropertiesMoistureThermal
Field variableWetness (C/Csat)Temperature
Density1Density
ConductivityD*CsatConductivity
Specific GravityCsatSpecific gravity

where Csat is saturated moisture concentration and D is diffusion coefficient.

"We use this analogy to simulate moisture absorption in multi-material semiconductor packages under various temperature and RH conditions. It works quite well. Ee Hua Wong (Institute of Microelectronics, Singapore) has developed the technique using ANSYS/Thermal simulations. Mr. Wong has produced several papers outlining the technique."


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Average Rating: 9.7 (58 votes)  
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FOUNDATION
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  A very simple example comparing use of SURF154 elastic foundation stiffness (EFS real constant) with force-distributed constraints (using MPC-based 17x contact elements) tied to a COMBIN14 spring element.
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Average Rating: 10.0 (10 votes)  
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HFTH
  Mark Troscinski (ANSYS, Inc.)
  "Please take a look at this input file. It's a sample problem I've run for someone who was using microwave radiation to heat paper-type products. The model is pretty simple, but it should illustrate the basic steps in running the coupled HF-electromagnetics/thermal problem."
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Average Rating: 10.0 (22 votes)  
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IN-3D
  Vladimir Zhulin (ANSYS, Inc.)
  3D beam under electrostatic load. Coupled-field problem using TRANS126 elements. Requires EMTGEN macro.
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Average Rating: 5.6 (18 votes)  
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MAPME
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  General macro used to map one set of values & (x,y,z) coordinates to another. Uses *MOPER,,,MAP.

Example input file can be found here which uses this macro. In this input example, *VPUT is used to compare mapping UX, UY, and UZ from one mesh to another. This can be used to map pressures, heat flux, convection, etc. from CFD codes to ANSYS, for example.

Alternate macro also available here.
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Average Rating: 10.0 (27 votes)  
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MICROOVEN
  Steve Groothuis (Micron Technology, Inc.)
  "The following input stream worked just fine in ANSYS 6.0 beta with no errors (1 warning for having both solid model and FE model BCs). Please try this file as I had to change your previous input file significantly. This input file should be generic enough to run in ANSYS 5.6. The bigger challenge will be having the appropriate electrical HF excitation model."
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Average Rating: 9.1 (22 votes)  
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NIP
  Dave Lindeman (3M)
  Example analysis of a head/media/roller NIP (structural nonlinear). Shows use of *VWRITE to write out an ABAQUS input deck.
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Average Rating: 6.7 (9 votes)  
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OUTRES
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  This is a simple example of using OUTRES with an array parameter to define at what time points results will be saved. This is useful if you want to control exactly when results will be stored, even with the automatic timestepping algorithm present.
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Average Rating: 10.0 (2 votes)  
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PENNY3D
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  Simple example using ANSYS Workbench 12.0 to show one way to generate a penny-shaped crack (3D crack) for fracture mechanics (using CINT command to evaluate J-integral and stress intensity factors).
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Average Rating: 9.8 (25 votes)  
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RIGIDBODY_ROTATION
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  This is a very simple example of using RBE3 or force-distributed type of surface constraint to track an averaged sense of the rotation or translation of a part within an assembly. By listing the displacements or rotations at the pilot node, one can obtain these quantities. (Remember that rotations are reported in radians, not degrees.)
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Average Rating: 9.0 (5 votes)  
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SILICON
  Steve Groothuis (Micron Technology, Inc.)
  Although strictly not an input file, the "silicon.mat" file contains temp-dependent properties of silicon. See this email from S. Groothuis for more informaiton.
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Average Rating: 9.5 (11 votes)  
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SPRING
  Dave Lindeman (3M)
  Attached is an input file that sets up and runs an analysis for a variable radius (hyperbolic) compression spring. You should be able to modify it for your needs.
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Average Rating: 8.7 (31 votes)  
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SUBSTR-FULLPOST
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  Fictitious model used to demonstrate substructuring. SETRAN and SESYMM are used to translate and reflect a superelement. RSPLIT and RSTOFF are also used, and postprocessing of the entire model (superelements and non-superelements) is shown.
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Average Rating: 6.7 (3 votes)  
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SURF_TRACTION
  Sheldon Imaoka (CSI)
  Shows surface effect element for traction load application.
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Average Rating: 10.0 (6 votes)  
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USER01
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  Very simple example showing use of user-defined command (USER01).

This UPF command simply reads and interpolates a defined table array. Use of the parevl() is also shown in this simple input.
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Average Rating: 10.0 (5 votes)  
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USERELEMENT
  Roger Young (Industrial Research Ltd.)
  "This package contains a number of examples of the Ansys user element <uel> which may be further adapted for personal use. The examples given here are for a 4-node planar element USER101 with linear shape functions similar to the Ansys element PLANE42. However USER101 may easily be extended to a 3D 8-node element and/or to quadratic shape functions by changing the specifications in lib/PAR.NML. In addition there is a simple extension to general large strain non-linear deformation which is illustrated in uel3/ex2."
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Average Rating: 5.0 (1 vote)  
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Various MEMS Examples Using ANSYS [ZIP]
  (EPFL, The Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne)
  Tutorials on using ANSYS with various MEMS examples. This was originally taken from EPFL's website.
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Average Rating: 9.3 (28 votes)  
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VM256 with Workbench Mechanical
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  Created a Workbench 12.0 version of VM256.
Useful for users who may wish to get a better understanding of implementing the CINT command inside of Workbench Mechanical for J-integral and stress intensity factor calculations.
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Average Rating: 6.4 (7 votes)  
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VM267 with Workbench Mechanical
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  Created a Workbench 12.0 version of VM267.
Useful for users who may wish to get a better understanding of implementing the CINT command inside of Workbench Mechanical for stress intensity factor calculations.
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Average Rating: 10.0 (6 votes)  
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