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Papers (7 entries)
 
Construction Machinery Cab Vibro-Acoustic Analysis and Optimisation
  L. Bregant, G. Miccoli, M. Seppi
  "A 3D cavity representing the earth-moving machine cab has been modelled by means of a FE structural mesh (Ansys), reproducing the characteristics of the real structure. Starting from the cab vibration load experimental acquisition, a BEM coupled analysis (Sysnoise) has been carried out to evaluate the cab inner vibro-acoustic field as a function of the physical properties of each structural element. A multi-objective design optimisation code (modeFrontier) drives the analysis process flow taking into account the cab parameter structural modifications and carrying out the vibro-acoustic field optimisation."
[ANSYS Dynamics, version unspecified]
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Average Rating: 10.0 (4 votes)  
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Design Optimization of an Automotive Universal Joint Considering Manufacturing Cost
  Nick Cristello and Il Yong Kim
  "This paper presents the shape optimization of an automotive universal joint, by simultaneously considering manufacturing cost, maximum drivable joint angle and part volume. Comprised of three main components - two yokes and a cross trunnion - a universal joint is a linkage used to transmit rotational motion from one shaft to another when the axes are coplanar, but not coinciding. In this research, universal joint designs are analyzed and compared using a weighted sum of three objective functions: minimization of machining cost, maximization of adjoining shaft joint angle, and minimization of total part volume. Part modeling and analysis is conducted using the Finite Element Analysis package ANSYS and optimization is implemented using MATLAB. The results show Pareto frontiers for both the flange and weld yoke, constructed using the Adaptive Weighted Sum technique. These frontiers clearly illustrate the trade-off between machining cost and joint angle; that is, to increase the joint angle, a corresponding increase in the cost of the part is required. It has been shown that maximization of driveable joint angle requires a simultaneous increase in machining cost of 4.4% and 2.7% for the flange and weld yoke, respectively."
[ANSYS Structural, version 9.0]
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Average Rating: 10.0 (5 votes)  
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Finite Element Analysis at Mannesmann VDO Fuel Systems [PDF]
  Zlatko Penzar
  PowerPoint presentation
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Average Rating: 8.3 (12 votes)  
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Modeling Diesel Engine Cylinder Head Gaskets using the Gasket Material Option of the SOLID185 Element
  Jonathan Raub
  "The modeling of diesel engine cylinder head gasket joints is complicated by the nonlinear response of the head gasketís materials. Linearization of these material responses can lead to significant errors in the solutionís results. The 1-dimensional nonlinear approximation made by the Gasket material option of the SOLID185 element sufficiently captures the response of the nonlinear gasket materials while maintaining practical solution times for the large model sizes associated with multi-cylinder head gasket joint models. This paper will give an overview of the model building and assembly process used to create a head gasket joint model, describe the nonlinear nature of the materials used in the model, and present comparisons of the modelís results with experimental measurements."

[STI: There is a gasket-specific material & element in 6.1, not available at the time of the writing]
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Average Rating: 9.2 (26 votes)  
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Numerial Implementation of Multiaxial High-Cycle Fatigue Criterion to Structural Optimization
  Miroslaw Mrzyglůd, Andrzej P. Zielinski
  "Modern multiaxial high-cycle fatigue criteria were investigated with respect to their application in structural optimization procedures coupled with finite element codes. As a result of tests carried out for several fatigue criteria, the Dang Van hypothesis was used for the detailed numerical study. A way of respective adapting the high-cycle load history was also suggested. The complete algorithm of the fatigue optimization was illustrated by applying the proposed procedures to vehicle parts which are subject to high-cycle loadings. The finite element code ANSYS was used in the structural modeling."
[ANSYS Structural, version 8.1]
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Average Rating: 5.0 (4 votes)  
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Physics first, using ANSYS to define the design: Real-life examples from the automotive supplier company Mannesmann VDO
  Zlatko Penzar
  "In many non-standard engineering development applications it strongly pays off to invest an effort into understanding the physics of the problem prior to undertaking complex numerical simulations. The better the knowledge of the leading physical effects in a complex system, the simpler and more cost-efficient the analytical model can be. Moreover, the understanding of the most important physical driving effects often enables one to build a simplified, closed-form mathematical effective model. Such models usually give insight into the interplay of various parameters governing the physical behavior of the complex system. In this way, a fast pre-optimization of the desired features is often possible. Subsequently, the rich arsenal of ANSYS multiphysics capabilities can be used to refine the judgements and obtain the desired quantitative solutions."
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Average Rating: 8.3 (15 votes)  
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Predicting Human Thermal Comfort in a Transient Nonuniform Thermal Environment
  J.P. Rugh, R.B. Farrington, D. Bharathan, A. Vlahinos, R. Burke, C. Huizenga, and H. Zhang
  "The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a suite of thermal comfort tools to assist in the development of smaller and more efficient climate control systems in automobiles. These tools, which include a 126-segment sweating manikin, a finite element physiological model of the human body, and a psychological model based on human subject testing, are designed to predict human thermal comfort in transient nonuniform thermal environments such as automobiles. The manikin measures the heat loss from the human body in the vehicle environment and sends the heat flux from each segment to the physiological model. The physiological model predicts the bodyís response to the environment, determines 126 segment skin temperatures, sweat rates, and breathing rate, and transmits the data to the manikin. The psychological model uses temperature data from the physiological model to predict the local and global thermal comfort as a function of local skin and core temperatures and their rates of change. Results of initial integration testing show the thermal response of a manikin segment to transient environmental conditions."
[ANSYS Thermal, version unknown]
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Average Rating: -5.0 (1 vote)  
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