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APDL Tips (27 entries)
 
*GET/*VGET Sheet
  (PADT)
  This is a handy sheet with *GET and *VGET items. A user can print this out as a reference sheet when writing APDL macros.
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Average Rating: 6.2 (72 votes)  
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*VWRITE options/formats
  (Various sources)
  Tips on *VWRITE formats (Fortran style).
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Average Rating: 9.1 (39 votes)  
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A brief overview of the condition number
  Aaron Acton (ANSYS, Inc.)
  "This article presents an overview of the condition number for a matrix and the potential effect of ill conditioning on the solution of a system of linear equations. The information is intended to be general, although specifi c information relevant to finite-element analysis is also included. Vector and matrix norms are introduced before de fining the condition number, and the choice of matrix norm in the calculation of the condition number is discussed. A method of estimating the condition number is also provided, including a sample implementation in the ANSYS Parametric Design Language (APDL)."
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Average Rating: 9.5 (11 votes)  
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ANSYS and Tcl/Tk customization
  John Swanson
  Information on using Tcl/Tk with ANSYS to create customized GUI. Tcl/Tk is used in ANSYS, such as the Contact Wizard, Solution Control Wizard, or Materials GUI at 5.7/6.0.
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Average Rating: 10.0 (27 votes)  
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ANSYS and UIDL customization
  John Swanson
  UIDL is the ANSYS language used to define the dialog boxes and Main Menu. This information is related to learning more about UIDL to create custom dialog boxes. An alternative is to use Tcl/Tk.
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Average Rating: 9.5 (11 votes)  
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ANSYS Function Boundary Conditions
  Achuth Rao (ANSYS, Inc.)
  When using the ANSYS Function Editor and Function Loader to define Function Boundary Conditions, a special type of table is used.
This document outlines the syntax of the function loading table.
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Average Rating: 9.8 (23 votes)  
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APDL and Vector Operations [ZIP]
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  "Vector and matrix operations in APDL are an invaluable method of manipulating array data, as they provide very fast, computationally efficient means of helping the user perform pre- or post-processing operations on the model.
There are many ways of storing data, ranging from arrays to tables to strings. Moreover, manipulation of numerical data can be in the form of vectors or matrices via the *Vxxx and *Mxxx commands, respectively. The user is referred to the APDL Programmer’s Guide in the ANSYS online help for a thorough discussion of the capabilities of APDL, but, in this memo, a basic introduction to vector operations will be covered."

(Week 24, week of 03/21/04.)
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Average Rating: 10.0 (9 votes)  
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APDL Coding Standards [PDF]
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  "Because of the flexibility and automation APDL (ANSYS Parametric Design Language) provides, many users tend to write input files and macros in addition to using the GUI.
There are currently no recognized ‘standards’ of writing APDL macros or input files, although there may exist standards within companies on APDL coding. The lack of APDL coding standards may make inheriting someone else’s input files or macros more difficult. Also, parameter or component conflicts may also arise when using multiple macros.
This memo hopes to provide some ideas for groups or individuals wishing to develop APDL standards in writing macros or input files."

(Week 17, week of 02/18/02.)
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Average Rating: 10.0 (24 votes)  
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Basics of ANSYS Macros [PDF]
  David Haberman (CSI)
  Basics of creating and using macros (APDL) in ANSYS.
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Average Rating: 8.0 (20 votes)  
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Building Parametric Models [PDF]
  David Haberman (CSI)
  This memo provides an overview of APDL, defining parameters, and creating parametric models.
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Average Rating: 10.0 (7 votes)  
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Creating APDL Macros [PDF]
  Mike Rife (CSI)
  The use of the Ansys Parametric Design Language, APDL, to create simple but reusable macros can be a significant time saver. This Tip of the Week will show two examples of macros written for current Ansys users. These macros may be extended or used as templates for future macros.
Helical fin macro and Strain energy plotting macro.
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Average Rating: 9.7 (15 votes)  
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Creating Custom Animations [ZIP]
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  "Animations are quite useful, both in presenting results of an analysis to others as well as obtaining better insight into the complex response of a system. While ANSYS has many built-in animation capabilities, sometimes, it may be necessary to create a macro for a customized animation. This memo covers one method of generating such animations."
(Week 1, week of 09/24/01.)
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Average Rating: 9.4 (31 votes)  
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Inquiry Function Matrix
  Jeroen Valensa (Modine Mfg. Co.)
  This is a handy reference sheet listing the different inquiry functions and options available.
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Average Rating: 8.2 (25 votes)  
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Introduction to Hidden Parameters
  John Crawford
  An introduction to hidden parameters, those which begin or end with an underscore. Use of parameters with a trailing underscore can be used to 'hide' macro parameters if they are to be shared by several users.
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Average Rating: 10.0 (5 votes)  
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Introduction to Inquiry Functions
  John Crawford
  Inquiry functions are similar to *GET functions, used to retreive information about the current database. These can be used in macros to automate procedures and obtain information in a simple manner.
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Average Rating: 8.7 (26 votes)  
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Long Parameter and Component Names at 6.0 [ZIP]
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  "Starting from version 5.7, strings have been introduced to replace character arrays. Strings allow for up to 128 characters for APDL purposes, instead of the 8-letter limit of character parameters. The /INQUIRE command as well as string manipulation functions (see *GET online help) extend the usefulness of strings to retrieve and manipulate data. *VWRITE has also been enhanced to support C-format statements, useful in writing out long strings."
"At 6.0, the 8-character limitation on parameters, components, and /POST26 variables has been removed. Users can now specify up to 32 character for these items, allowing for much more descriptive names. In /POST26, variables can also be referred to by name when plotting or listing."

(Week 16, week of 01/28/02.)
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Average Rating: 10.0 (4 votes)  
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Manipulating FE Mesh [ZIP]
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  "There are some special situations where a user may be required to generate or manipulate a database consisting mainly of finite element entities without solid model geometry. With some careful planning, dealing with mesh-only databases can prove to be relatively easy.

Typical situations that may arise include the following:
  • Import of mesh from Workbench Simulation or AI*Environment/ICEM CFD
  • Generation of repetitive geometry
This memo hopes to cover these situations in more detail."

(Week 31, week of 10/02/05.)
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Average Rating: 7.7 (15 votes)  
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Nested macros, local parameters, trailing underscores
  Martin Herrenbruck (Technische Universität München)
  "A macro file is a file which contains Ansys commands. If you save your macro in your working directory or in the macro directory (see /PSEARCH command) you just enter the macro name in the command line and all these commands will be executed. You can even nest macros: from your main file you call e.g. zzmacro1 which again calls zzmacro2. The only problem is that a macro could change - and you would probably not notice that - the value of a parameter you are using in your main input file. This will be the case if the same parameter name is used accidentally in both the macro and your main input. Let's see how one can avoid these nasty errors - just click on the link!"
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Average Rating: 10.0 (1 vote)  
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Parametric Studies in ANSYS [PDF]
  Sean Harvey (CSI)
  Automated parametric studies in ANSYS (generating and using parametric input files).
Example input file.
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Average Rating: 10.0 (7 votes)  
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Postprocessing Harmonic Results [ZIP]
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  "In harmonic analyses, due to the fact that results may not be in phase, postprocessing quantities of interest can pose a challenge. Users may need to review non-sinusoidal results, such as equivalent stresses, at different locations, so accounting for phase information may be required.
This memo hopes to cover some of the more important points regarding postprocessing structural harmonic analysis results in both the General and Time-History Postprocessors."

(Week 30, week of 07/17/05.)
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Average Rating: 10.0 (22 votes)  
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POW2MAT
  Carl Olsard (noiseboard.com)
  "This is a simple program written in Turbo pascal which I find very useful for converting the output from ANSYS (prvar, prnsol, etc) into columns, while removing the headers at the start and between the page listings. The program is used at a DOS prompt and one types in: pow2mat col filein fileout , where col are the number of columns in the output, filein MUST have an extension .val and fileout WILL have an extension .txt. You do NOT type in the extensions, they are default. For example, you would type pow2mat 7 nodelist nodelist which would extract 7 columns from the file nodelist.val and write a stripped file called nodelist.txt . If you have several files to convert, you can use the DOS FOR command as follows:
FOR %I IN (*.val) DO pow2mat 3 %~nI %~nI"

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Average Rating: 10.0 (2 votes)  
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Returning Values in a Macro
  Primoz Cermelj
  An example on returning values from a macro. This uses a parameter name as an argument which can then be modified and returned back for use in ANSYS.
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Average Rating: 10.0 (11 votes)  
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Tabular Boundary Conditions and Function Editor at 6.0 [PDF]
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  "This tips and tricks is an introductory memo on the use of tabular and function boundary conditions. The use of the Function Editor is also discussed."
(Week 9, week of 12/03/01.)
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Average Rating: 8.9 (28 votes)  
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Tip on 4D and 5D Tables
  Sheldon Imaoka (ANSYS, Inc.)
  Simple tip on defining the indices for 4D and 5D tables (*DIM,,TAB4 and *DIM,,TAB5) using *TAXIS or manually by specifying the proper indices.
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Average Rating: 10.0 (3 votes)  
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Using Birth and Death with Multiframe Restart
  Odd Einar Lindøe (Imenco Engineering)
  Tips on using element birth and death (EKILL/EALIVE) with multiframe restart (RESCONTROL). By default, one cannot use birth and death with multiframe restart since the .rdb file is resumed (and the latest information is in .db, not .rdb). This tip shows some methods of using birth and death with multiframe restart.
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Average Rating: 9.6 (14 votes)  
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Vector operations and commands [PDF]
  Sheldon Imaoka (CSI)
  Vector notation/functions in ANSYS allow the user to execute some of these *DO loops in a much more efficient manner. Instead of looping through individual functions, vector functions act upon arrays, resulting in faster execution times. This memo will provide some basic/introductory examples on the use of *VGET as well as the undocumented vector notation.
HTML Version here.
Accompanying input file, BUILDN1 macro, and BUILDN2 macro.

In the memo, in Section 2, please note that there is a typo. The section with the following lines:
*vget,NARRAY(1,1),node,1,u,x
*vmask,NMASK(1)
*vget,NARRAY(1,2),node,2,u,y
*vmask,NMASK(1)
*vget,NARRAY(1,3),node,3,u,z
should be replaced as follows:
*vget,NARRAY(1,1),node,1,u,x
*vmask,NMASK(1)
*vget,NARRAY(1,2),node,1,u,y
*vmask,NMASK(1)
*vget,NARRAY(1,3),node,1,u,z

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Average Rating: 8.2 (14 votes)  
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Visualizing structural matrices in ANSYS using APDL
  Aaron Acton (ANSYS, Inc.)
  "This article presents a method of visualizing structural matrices used in finite-element analysis using ANSYS and the ANSYS Parametric Design Language (APDL). The information is intended to provide some insight into the nature of structural matrices used in finite-element codes. Some terms used in sparse-matrix arithmetic are discussed, and methods for calculating certain quantities are provided. A test model is constructed to demonstrate how the stiff ness, mass, and damping matrices may be visualized for various systems. The eff ect of element shape, element type (including superelements), element reordering, and equation reordering on structural matrices is briefly investigated."
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Average Rating: 9.3 (15 votes)  
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